Stephen fry the secret life of the manic depressive 2006

Stephen Fry: my long battle with manic depression

stephen fry the secret life of the manic depressive 2006

Stephen Fry: The Secret Life of the Manic Depressive is a two-part television documentary directed by Ross Wilson and featuring British actor and.

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A decade after his documentary, Stephen Fry looked at how attitudes and awareness around mental health have changed in this important film. As he did in his ground-breaking film, Stephen Fry set the tone with a frank recall of his suicide attempt. It was hard to reconcile the composed, rational man on the screen with the one that was found on the floor in a Uganda hotel comatose from pills and vodka. But this was as much, if not more, about the non-celebrity subjects. We watched as she led her daughter by the hand around the zoo to calm her, then comfort her as she suffered a low.

Robert Downey Jr. Sign in. David Oyelowo Don't Let Go , Selma fills in the blanks on his career, including one credit he wishes he could get a do-over on. Watch now. Actor Stephen Fry has for two years seeking up some of the most homophobic persons in the world who spend most of their time fighting gays, and challenges their view upon their extreme homophobia. Actor and writer Stephen Fry explores his passion for the world's most controversial composer - Richard Wagner.

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The Not So Secret Life of the Manic Depressive: Ten Years On

New study sheds light on Stephen Fry’s portrayal of manic depression

Actor and writer to return to the subject in The Not So Secret Life of the Manic Depressive following the landmark documentary about his own mental illness in By Ben Dowell. Stephen Fry is to revisit the subject of mental illness ten years after his acclaimed documentary The Secret Life of the Manic Depressive. He will be interviewed in the BBC1 programme, talking more about his bipolar condition and his suicide attempt while filming in Uganda in One of the subjects interviewed is Cordelia who featured in the original series. An academic high-achiever who with the support of her family was struggling to find a place for herself in the world she continues to battling with bipolarity which is such a powerful force in her life that for her it eclipses even the terminal cancer she is now dying from. To find out what has changed, what progress has been made and what the future holds for people living with mental health conditions in the UK.

Sitting in a garage, his hand on the car ignition, he contemplated suicide for two hours, before fleeing his home country for the European mainland. It wasn't until this frightening episode that Fry was diagnosed with manic depression, or bipolar disorder, a psychological condition that sees its sufferers oscillating dangerously between dizzying heights of mania and gutting troughs of prolonged depression. This 2 part documentary unfolds like a personal journey of self-discovery. Fry confronts his medical condition by consulting experts and others who have suffered the disorder including Richard Dreyfuss and Carrie Fisher. This is a valuable documentary, and, having been acquainted only with Stephen Fry's bubbly TV persona, a fascinatingly intimate character study. Login to be first!

Eleven years after he walked out of the starring role in a West End theatre production and fled the country, Stephen Fry has spoken of his battle with manic depression for a new BBC2 show he hopes will break the taboos surrounding mental health. In The Secret Life of a Manic Depressive the comedian, actor and author talks of his struggle with bipolar disorder and interviews others who have the condition. I went into my garage, sealed the door with a duvet I'd brought and got into my car. I sat there for at least, I think, two hours in the car, my hands on the ignition key. It was, you know, a suicide attempt, not a cry for help. I just knew I couldn't be at home. I really believed I would never come back to England.

New study sheds light on Stephen Fry's portrayal of manic depression

Fry himself suffers from a less severe version of the illness called cyclothymia. The Robbie Williams segment, featured in the original BBC broadcast, was cut from further airings as well as the DVD release, likely due to copyright issues with the musical inserts. Peter Gabriel was reportedly approached to appear. To the best of my knowledge, I am not bipolar. I can be a little up and down, but not the same extremes as manic depressives I have known. But I think it's helpful to talk about this, especially for men.

November 29, Despite the suffering caused by bipolar disorder — also known as manic depression—a significant minority of patients actually want to keep it because of the creative highs it gives them, according to new research from University of Manchester psychologists. In the online survey of people, 26 of them would want to keep their bipolar disorder —in which they experience deep depression but at other times euphoria. TV personality Stephen Fry's own experiences were highlighted in his documentary "The secret life of a manic depressive. Of the people he interviewed with the condition, most, he said, would not 'push a button' to remove their bipolar disorder. Like Fry's documentary, the Manchester study showed that people who see bipolar disorder as part of their personal identity were less likely to want full recovery.

Despite the suffering caused by bipolar disorder — also known as manic depression, a significant minority of patients actually want to keep it because of the creative highs it gives them, according to new research from University of Manchester psychologists. In the online survey of people, 26 of them would want to keep their Bipolar Disorder - in which they experience deep depression but at other times euphoria. Yet, unlike the observations of Fry, the majority of respondents in the Manchester study 77 of them did want their disorder removed permanently. The Manchester study also showed a more subtle range of views — people with the condition reported a wide variety of both positive and negative views of their condition. The results, says Dr Mansell, could have an important impact on designing services for people with the diagnosis. They were then asked the same question about a reversible button press - one in which they could switch the disorder on and off as and when they wanted.

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