They re a rotten crowd

The Great Gatsby

they re a rotten crowd

In The Great Gatsby, what does Nick mean when he says "They’re a rotten crowd You’re worth Do you agree with Nick's final assertion that Gatsby is "worth the whole damn bunch put together" In The Great Gatsby, how does Nick's comment to Gatsby that he "is worth the whole.

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Finally, right before Gatsby dies, Nick realizes that all the people he's been hanging around with are no good. Gee, took you long enough, Nick. I couldn't forgive him or like him, but I saw that what he had done was, to him, entirely justified. It was all very careless and confused. They were careless people, Tom and Daisy — they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made […]. Nick may understand Tom, but he's not happy about it: he's dissatisfied with the way Tom and Daisy are dealing with this tragedy, and it's enough to send him scurrying back West in search of something else to be dissatisfied about.

Post a Comment. Thursday, April 15, Even though Nick disapproves of him all along, he is still able to put his thoughts aside and give a compliment that Gatsby would never forget. This passage is very important to the novel because Nick never tells the other characters what he thinks about them, the readers are the only ones that get a chance to see what Nick is thinking. Perhaps the reason that Nick never criticized the other characters face to face was due to his fathers influence. Earlier in the novel, Nick shares a quote from his father.

We see Nick becoming increasingly judgemental throughout the novel. By the end he sees the people he has been associating with in the East as morally bankrupt and he returns to the Midwest so as not to be exposed to their superficial ways. Nick ultimately accepts that his moral values are conservative, mid-Western ones. He begins the book by saying that he abides by his father's dictum in withholding criticism if he is not in full possession of the facts, and he is therefore "inclined to reserve all judgements". But he goes on to say that his tolerance "has a limit".

Source: The Great Gatsby. Author: F. Scott Fitzgerald. We shook hands and I started away. Just before I reached the hedge I remembered something and turned around.

Sign in with Facebook Sign in options. Join Goodreads. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby. Share this quote:. Like Quote.



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