What can you take for a head cold when pregnant

Cold Medicine and Pregnancy

what can you take for a head cold when pregnant

Cold and Cough in Pregnancy - Home Remedies ! Get Well Quickly - Ango

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By Kathryn Hayward Oct 3, Photo: Stocksy. You know that unpasteurized brie is a no-go during pregnancy, and those double martinis and oysters on the half shell are strictly verboten. But what about cold and flu medications? When you inevitably come down with a hacking cough, myriad aches and pains, and a serious case of the sniffles, what can you take? Here, our guide to navigating cold and flu season with a baby on board.

Back to Your pregnancy and baby guide. Before taking any medicine when you're pregnant, including painkillers, check with your pharmacist, midwife or GP that it's suitable. When deciding whether to take a medicine during pregnancy, it's important to find out about the possible effects of that medicine on your baby. This is the case both for medicines prescribed by a doctor and for medicines you buy from a pharmacy or shop. You can find out information on medicines in pregnancy on the bumps best use of medicines in pregnancy website. But it's also important to never stop taking a medicine that's been prescribed to keep you healthy without first checking with your doctor.

The downside of this immune suppression, though, is that your body can't ward off colds as well as it normally does, making you more vulnerable to the stuffy nose, cough and sore throat that come with the virus. As for you, colds are mostly an uncomfortable annoyance best managed with rest, fluids, patience and a quick call to your practitioner to make sure he or she is aware of all your symptoms, including any fever. If necessary, your doctor can also steer you towards cold medications that are considered safe during pregnancy. A cold usually begins with a sore or scratchy throat that lasts for a day or two, followed by the gradual appearance of other symptoms, including:. Colds are most commonly caused by a type of virus known as a rhinovirus, which is easily passed from person to person. There are or more cold viruses, which is why you keep getting them.

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We respect your privacy. Coming down with the common cold is always unpleasant, let alone if you're pregnant. While many medications are off-limits during pregnancy , there are some remedies to relieve your symptoms. Before you consider taking drugstore medicines for the common cold , you might want to consider some good old-fashioned home remedies, says Elisa Ross, MD, an obstetrician and gynecologist on staff with the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. The reason: No over-the-counter medicines are really treating the cold or helping you get better, they just control symptoms. Herbal medications in particular aren't regulated, so it's difficult to know exactly what ingredients they contain and whether they're safe. Herbs can cross the placenta and reach the baby, so it's best to avoid them.



How to treat your cold and flu while pregnant

When you become pregnant , everything that happens to you can affect not just your body, but that of your unborn child. This realization can make dealing with illness more complicated. In the past, if you got a cold or became sick with the flu , you may have taken an over-the-counter OTC decongestant.

What to do if you catch a cold when pregnant

Getting the cold or flu when you are pregnant can affect your unborn baby. If you are considering pregnancy or are already pregnant, it is highly recommended that you have the flu vaccination to help protect you and your baby. A cold is a very common mild viral infection of the nose, throat, sinuses and upper airways. It can cause a blocked nose followed by a runny nose, sneezing, a sore throat and a cough. The cold will usually last for about a week as the body fights off the infection.

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    How to treat your cold and flu while pregnant

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